Thursday, December 20, 2012

Dynamic Routing Configuration – RIP, IGRP




















I think If you followed the previous posts that I published under IP configuration in CISCO Packet tracer software, this won't be a big task for yu to design and load the above network now.

Follow the steps below one by one so that you will be learning how to perform dynamic routing configuration without having doubts. Though the steps are almost similar to the previous post, I'll be mentioning the commands of CLI then and there as necessary.


Step1: Design the above network and load it in to Packet Tracer Simulator.

Note:   For R1 and R3 - Router 1841.            For R2 – router 2811
            Select R1 – S0 and R2 – S1 as DCE side for clocking inside the simulator.

Step2 :Name R1, R2 and R3 as Malabe, Metro and Matara.


Router(config)#hostname MALABE
Router(config)#hostname METRO
Router(config)#hostname MATARA

Step3 : Design a suitable IP plan for the above networks.

For simplicity, the IP plan is marked clearly in the above diagram it self making easy for you to understand. I have used subnetting in the very similar way that was used in the previouse post (STATIC ROUTING AND DEFAULT ROUTING CONFIGURATIONS)

Step4 : Configure the Serial and Ethernet interfaces of routers.

Step5: Assign clock rate as 64000 for the R1 serial 0 and R2 serial 1 interfaces.


For Router1
MALABE(config)#interface fastEthernet 0/0
MALABE(config-if)#ip address 192.168.10.1 255.255.255.0
MALABE(config-if)#no shutdown
MALABE(config-if)#exit

MALABE(config)#interface serial 0/0/0
MALABE(config-if)#ip address 10.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
MALABE(config-if)#clock rate 64000
MALABE(config-if)#no shutdown

MALABE(config-if)#exit

For Router2
MATARA(config)#interface fastEthernet 0/0
MATARA(config-if)#ip address 192.168.12.1 255.255.255.0
MATARA(config-if)#no shutdown
MATARA(config-if)#exit

MATARA(config)#interface serial 0/0/0
MATARA(config-if)#ip address 11.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
MATARA(config-if)#no shutdown
MATARA(config-if)#exit

For Router0
METRO(config)#interface fastEthernet 0/0
METRO(config-if)#ip address 192.168.11.1 255.255.255.0
METRO(config-if)#no shutdown
METRO(config-if)#exit

METRO(config)#interface serial 0/0/0
METRO(config-if)#ip address 10.0.0.2 255.0.0.0
METRO(config-if)#no shutdown

METRO(config-if)#exit
METRO(config)#interface serial 0/0/1
METRO(config-if)#ip address 11.0.0.1 255.0.0.0
METRO(config-if)#clock rate 64000
METRO(config-if)#no shutdown

METRO(config-if)#exit

Step6 : Configure the PC’s. (IP address, Subnet Mask and Default Gateway).











Configure the routers with RIP and IGRP to enable dynamic routing.

Dynamic routing could be done using Interior Gateway Protocols (IGP) and Exterior Gateway Protocols (EGP). We apply IGP for LANs and EGP for WANs.

IGRP, EIGRP, RIP and OSPF are some of these IGPs and BGP is an example for EGP.

First let’s see how to perform routing using RIP

Here for each router we have to use RIP and consider the directly connected network addresses of them to perform this routing.

MALABE(config)#router rip
MALABE(config-router)#network 192.168.10.0
MALABE(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0

METRO(config)#router rip
METRO(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0
METRO(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0
METRO(config-router)#network 192.168.11.0

MATARA(config)#router rip
MATARA(config-router)#network 192.168.12.0
MATARA(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0

Use ‘ping’ command to check the connectivity.

For PC0
PC>ipconfig

IP Address......................: 192.168.10.2
Subnet Mask.....................: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway.................: 192.168.10.1

PC>ping 192.168.11.2

Pinging 192.168.11.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.11.2: bytes=32 time=94ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.11.2: bytes=32 time=94ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.11.2: bytes=32 time=79ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.11.2: bytes=32 time=73ms TTL=126

Ping statistics for 192.168.11.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 73ms, Maximum = 94ms, Average = 85ms

PC>ping 192.168.12.2

Pinging 192.168.12.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=111ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=109ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=110ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 192.168.12.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 109ms, Maximum = 125ms, Average = 113ms

PC>


For PC1

PC>ipconfig

IP Address......................: 192.168.12.2
Subnet Mask.....................: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway.................: 192.168.12.1

PC>ping 192.168.10.2

Pinging 192.168.10.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=125
Reply from 192.168.10.2: bytes=32 time=125ms TTL=125

Ping statistics for 192.168.10.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 125ms, Maximum = 125ms, Average = 125ms

PC>ping 192.168.12.2

Pinging 192.168.12.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=15ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=0ms TTL=128
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=15ms TTL=128

Ping statistics for 192.168.12.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 0ms, Maximum = 15ms, Average = 7ms


For PC2
PC>ipconfig

IP Address......................: 192.168.11.2
Subnet Mask.....................: 255.255.255.0
Default Gateway.................: 192.168.11.1

PC>ping 192.168.10.0

Pinging 192.168.10.0 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 10.0.0.1: bytes=32 time=63ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.0.0.1: bytes=32 time=63ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.0.0.1: bytes=32 time=63ms TTL=254
Reply from 10.0.0.1: bytes=32 time=62ms TTL=254

Ping statistics for 192.168.10.0:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 62ms, Maximum = 63ms, Average = 62ms

PC>ping 192.168.12.2

Pinging 192.168.12.2 with 32 bytes of data:

Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=93ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=94ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=94ms TTL=126
Reply from 192.168.12.2: bytes=32 time=94ms TTL=126

Ping statistics for 192.168.12.2:
    Packets: Sent = 4, Received = 4, Lost = 0 (0% loss),
Approximate round trip times in milli-seconds:
    Minimum = 93ms, Maximum = 94ms, Average = 93ms

PC>


Now let’s see how to perform routing using EIGRP

EIGRP is also an Interior Gateway protocol which is applied to one autonomous system. So to apply it, first we should have the same Autonomous number for all the networks. Otherwise all PC in the Autonomous system cannot communicate.
How to apply?

Note:-do not use many protocols at the same time. If so, first remove all the previous routing commands and then use EIGRP (In this case…type…no router rip in each router)

MALABE(config)#router eigrp 200
MALABE(config-router)#network 192.168.10.0
MALABE(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0

METRO(config)#router eigrp 200
METRO(config-router)#network 10.0.0.0
METRO(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0
METRO(config-router)#network 192.168.11.0

MATARA(config)#router eigrp 200 
MATARA(config-router)#network 192.168.12.0
MATARA(config-router)#network 11.0.0.0

According to the methods shown above routing could be done statically or dynamically by using routing protocols (or even by default) to route different networks to communicate with each other.